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Polio Vaccination in Nigeria: The ‘good’, the ‘bad’ and the ‘ugly’

MM Baba, Michael Ayivor.

Abstract
With increase in the number of polio cases, Nigeria serves as the primary threat to a polio free world. The “good” the bad” and “the ugly” aspects of polio vaccination in Nigeria is discussed. In the ‘good’ aspect the number of wild poliovirus cases declined by over 90%, cVDPV 2 cases declined by 82%. Similarly, genetic clusters of both wild poliovirus type 1 and type 3 have re-duced form 18 and 19 in 2009 to 2 respectively. The Immunity to polioviruses has improved in endemic States and new approaches for better identification of settlements and to promote com-munity participation have been adopted in 2012. On the ‘bad ‘aspect, polio cases have increased from 21 in 2010 to 62 in 2011 and 84 in 2012(7th September) with ongoing transmission of wild poliovirus type1, 3 and cVDPV2. Declined political oversight at critical juncture and non Im-plementation of emergency plans in key infected areas has been observed. Non-compliance to the vaccine seems to be the major contributor to the increasing number of polio cases in the country. Lastly “the ugly” face focuses on the aftermath of the boycott of polio vaccination in northern States in 2003 amidst the rumor that the vaccine contained infertility drugs, causes poli-omyelitis and spread HIV. After resolving the crisis, some parents in the north still resist com-pliance with the polio vaccination. Borrowing a leave from the rally organized by the polio vic-tims, all Nigerians should complement the government efforts in ‘kicking’ polio out of the coun-try.

Key words: Polio vaccination; wild polio virus; Immunization plus Days; Micro Planning, Nigeria


 
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How to Cite this Article
Pubmed Style

Baba M, Ayivor M. Polio Vaccination in Nigeria: The ‘good’, the ‘bad’ and the ‘ugly’. Int J Med Sci Public Health. 2013; 2(1): 137-145. doi:10.5455/ijmsph.2013.2.137-145



Web Style

Baba M, Ayivor M. Polio Vaccination in Nigeria: The ‘good’, the ‘bad’ and the ‘ugly’. www.scopemed.org/?mno=27026 [Access: November 19, 2017]. doi:10.5455/ijmsph.2013.2.137-145



AMA (American Medical Association) Style

Baba M, Ayivor M. Polio Vaccination in Nigeria: The ‘good’, the ‘bad’ and the ‘ugly’. Int J Med Sci Public Health. 2013; 2(1): 137-145. doi:10.5455/ijmsph.2013.2.137-145



Vancouver/ICMJE Style

Baba M, Ayivor M. Polio Vaccination in Nigeria: The ‘good’, the ‘bad’ and the ‘ugly’. Int J Med Sci Public Health. (2013), [cited November 19, 2017]; 2(1): 137-145. doi:10.5455/ijmsph.2013.2.137-145



Harvard Style

Baba, M. & Ayivor, M. (2013) Polio Vaccination in Nigeria: The ‘good’, the ‘bad’ and the ‘ugly’. Int J Med Sci Public Health, 2 (1), 137-145. doi:10.5455/ijmsph.2013.2.137-145



Turabian Style

Baba, MM, and Michael Ayivor. 2013. Polio Vaccination in Nigeria: The ‘good’, the ‘bad’ and the ‘ugly’. International Journal of Medical Science and Public Health , 2 (1), 137-145. doi:10.5455/ijmsph.2013.2.137-145



Chicago Style

Baba, MM, and Michael Ayivor. "Polio Vaccination in Nigeria: The ‘good’, the ‘bad’ and the ‘ugly’." International Journal of Medical Science and Public Health 2 (2013), 137-145. doi:10.5455/ijmsph.2013.2.137-145



MLA (The Modern Language Association) Style

Baba, MM, and Michael Ayivor. "Polio Vaccination in Nigeria: The ‘good’, the ‘bad’ and the ‘ugly’." International Journal of Medical Science and Public Health 2.1 (2013), 137-145. Print. doi:10.5455/ijmsph.2013.2.137-145



APA (American Psychological Association) Style

Baba, M. & Ayivor, M. (2013) Polio Vaccination in Nigeria: The ‘good’, the ‘bad’ and the ‘ugly’. International Journal of Medical Science and Public Health , 2 (1), 137-145. doi:10.5455/ijmsph.2013.2.137-145



latest news

Retraction notice [Dec 03, 2016]
Retraction notice [Mar 02, 2015]
Submission of article [Jul 22, 2012]


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